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26.11.07

Ornamental Sweet Potato Vine Roots

Ornamental Sweet Potato Vine rootsOn the other blog I wrote an entry on how to root ornamental sweet potato vine cuttings and in this one I posted pictures of my sweet potato vine tubers after I lifted them to store them for the winter. If you're looking to root sweet potato vines or store the tubers visit the links right above


Rooting Ornamental Sweet Potato Vine Cuttings

 

When I first purchased my ornamental sweet potato vines back in the spring I decided I would root cuttings since I had heard they were easy to start from cuttings One of the sources I came across stated that roots would start to grow on your ornamental sweet potato vine cuttings within five days. I didn't think they would grow so quick now since we're approaching winter and plants aren't actively growing. But sure enough these cuttings started to root within a week and in plain water.

With the tubers and cuttings I have rooting next year I won't have to buy any new ornamental sweet potato vine plants for the garden. Although I may not grow the green colored variety and just stick to the black sweet potato vine. If you're interested in what the flower looks like you can see a photo of the beautiful flower in my entry Ipomoea batatas 'Blackie.'

21 comments:

  1. I don't believe I've Ever seen the Ornamental Sweet Potato vines flower! But, then, the only two I've seen are the chartreuse and the variegated green, pink & white leafed ones. So, if you root them indoors in the Fall, will you be planting them indoors before Spring? Will they do very well with indoors light, or do you put them under a grow light?

    ReplyDelete
  2. I think the roots on my cutting may be as long as the cuttings themselves by now. :-)I keep forgetting to get out to the garden shed and get some potting soil to pot them up.
    Great close up photo of your rooted cuttings!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Shady,

    Until I saw mine I'd never seen them flower either. I think I'll leave mine in the water until we get close to spring. I don't have room for another large pot in the windows.

    Connie,

    Mine have ground a bunch since I took the photo. They're inside of a small bud vase and have almost grown around the whole thing.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I'm a landscaper, so have been growing these as part of annual arrangements for several years. The flowers surprised the heck out of me the first time! Not all flower, but 'Blackie' does, sporadically, with flowers that show its closeness to morning glories.

    Also, if you're using a food-safe/organic growing medium & fertilizer, don't hesitate to cook up any huge tubers that you aren't rooting -- they're a little different than grocery store sweet potatoes, but earthy and mild.

    ReplyDelete
  5. @yardandahalf

    Hi, thanks for stopping by and commenting. Interesting that you mentioned the flowering habit I've been wondering about the reason the green one didn't flower.

    I've read that they were edible but since I use Miracle-Gro I haven't gotten up the nerve to see about eating them.

    BTW I think you may be the very first ever livejournal user to comment.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I need help. I grew a sweet pot. vine last year and when I pulled the vines off in the fall it almost scared me. The tubers were enormous and one is as big as a basketball. I saved it but now don't know what to do with it. I can send pic's if anyone is interested. Help!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love the light green variety. They are prolific and the only plant of that color. Often they are used commercially because they are so durable. Question is....can you eat the tubers? Well, I have eaten but wonder if this is ok.

      They seem to be rather flavorless, like a white sweet.

      Delete
  7. Hi Pete,

    You just plant the tuber back in the ground or pot when it is warm enough in your area.

    ReplyDelete
  8. Anonymous3:19 PM

    Hello, I'm new to this blog. I want to send some sweet potato vine, green color to my friend in Paris, France. Could someone please give me the best way to do this as I see they don't come from seed. Can I just put a plant from the garden center in a box and hope for the best or does someone have a more educated idea? Many thanks.
    arco iris.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Arco iris,

    Sorry for the late reply. I would imagine that ornamental sweet potato vines would be available locally for your friend in France. Trying to ship plants across borders could prove difficult and maybe a frustrating experience. In theory you could put a plant in a box and ship it, but unless you're paying for it to go overnight then the plant could die or dry out. That is if customs allows the plant out of your country and into France.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Anonymous6:46 PM

    i found a sweet potato growing a very beautiful purple vine in my pantry. i wont tell you how much my family got in trouble for it. but i desided to plant it. i put the toothpicks in it in a glass of water. is that right? any thing else i need to do?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Anonymous, If it is already growing you can place the sweet potato tuber in soil and let it grow. There's no need to put it in water at this point since it is already growing.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Anonymous3:13 PM

    Yes, me too! I just dug up my dead flowers and vines and to my shock I have beautiful pinky red "potato tubers"....they look good enough to eat! I cannot believe how many developed from just one vine....at least 12 enormous tubers. Plus I had a vine scrunched in a hanging basket and the tubers were just as big.....the vine lime green....all tubers a beautiful pinky red..how fun!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. me too. I have eaten. Guess they can be stored and planted next year. Or buried and winter over?

      Delete
  13. @Anonymous, I saw a local chef collect some tubers from public planters here last year and cook them. The ornamental are edible and I guess don't taste too bad when properly prepared.

    ReplyDelete
  14. Anonymous9:24 PM

    where can you purchase these Ornamental Sweet Potato Vine Plants

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Most nurseries including the chain stores sell in the spring when they introduce annuals for the year.

      Delete
  15. Anonymous8:59 AM

    Hi Mr. Brown Thumb, I know this post is old, I wonder if you'll see my question? So, where can I find purple sweet potato tubers? I know I can start regular sweet potato vines from store bought spuds, but where do I get the purple ones?! Thanks in advance! Nicole

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nicole, the purple vines are usually found in garden centers and nurseries in late spring and early summer. There are a few different varieties available so it shouldn't be a problem finding a dark one if you don't particularly care about a black sweet potato vine with a name.

      Delete
  16. Anonymous11:47 AM

    when one grows white potatoes, you cut the tubers into chunks - each chunk must have an eye. then you plant the chunks. can I cut up my ornamental sweet potatoes the same way? the tubers are too large to pot

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am going to try this. And start some vines in water.

      Delete

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