Search

Search My Garden Blog with Google Custom Search

31.12.12

Jade Plant Leaf Cutting Propagation

Jade plant, jade tree, and money plant, are some of the common names for Crassula ovata. Jade plants are evergreen succulents with thick branches and green, oval leaves. They're one of the easiest succulents to grow, and they are also one of the easiest to propagate. Jade plants can be propagated through cuttings of stems and branches, but jade plant leaf cuttings are easy to propagate as well.

How-to Root Jade Plant cuttings



Jade plant propagation can be accomplished by rooting jade plant cuttings in water, but it isn't necessary. In fact, I find jade tree propagation to be easier in soil. Jade plant cuttings in water develop what is referred to as “water roots” that can easily break off when you transfer the cutting into a pot with house plant or cactus and succulent potting mix.

Last year, I took a bunch of jade plant leaf cuttings (simply twisted the leaves off the stem) and rooted the leaves in soil as end of the school year gifts for my nephew’s classmates. If you have grown a jade tree you know how easily the leaves fall off, and rooting the leaves--instead of branches or stems--allows you to propagate many more little jade trees for your collection or to give as gifts.


Whether the jade plant leaf you are propagating fell off or you removed it from the plant: Let the cutting sit somewhere out of direct sunlight for 3-5 days before attempting to propagate it. This will allow the cut end of the leaf to dry and start to form a callus that will keep it from rotting.

Insert the pointy end of the leaf into your preferred potting mix for house plants or cacti and succulents. Keep the jade plant leaf out of direct sunlight while you are waiting for roots to grow. If your leaf cuttings are in direct sunlight they may dry out and shrivel before the roots have a chance to form. Bright and dappled shade is the best lighting for cuttings. Mist or gently water the leaf cutting(s) once after you inserted it into pot. After that water as needed when the soil looks really dry.

Jade Plant Leaf Propagation

You will know for sure that your jade plant has started to root when you see new leaves (or a stem) start to grow from the tip of the leaf cutting.

I find the best time to propagate jade trees is in the spring and summer. If it is too cold when you are attempting to root cuttings they can sit in the cold, wet potting mix and rot.

Jade plants made excellent house plants because they are durable, can go long periods without being watered, and when they get ideal conditions also flower. Jades also make good candidates for indoor bonsai cultivation. There are several Jade plant varieties and cultivars that you can find at garden centers and nurseries, and they’re all as easy to propagate. Besides propagating jade plants through leaf cuttings, you can root jade plant stems and branches easily.

24 comments:

  1. We received a set of jade plant cuttings from my husband's boss. They are doing well so far. Thanks for this post. After reading it, I needed to go back and correct some mistakes I made in my original propagation. Now to keep the youngest girl away from it. She likes to pull the plants out and blow on the roots.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. MMG, Good luck with your jade plant cuttings. That's pretty funny about your daughter. If the plant root after she blows on them maybe you should let her do that with all the plants. :0)

      Delete
  2. You remind me that i ned tocall my cousin and ask her to send me leaves from "her" jade, which is descended from my grandmother's plant and must be at least 60 years old. Nothing beats a living legacy.

    Happy New Year, MBT!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Webb,

      That's sooo true. Nothing like heirloom plants that have been passed down through the family. Hope your cousin parts with some jade tree leaves so you can propagate your grandmother's plant.

      Delete
  3. come from our Eastern Cape and Kwazulu-Natal. We have 3 in a row and our friend calls it our hedge fund.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. A couple of years back I visited family in California and they had hedges make of jade plants. I was in awe. Back in Chicago jade trees of that size would go for hundreds of dollars. I mentioned them on Twitter at the time and someone said that jade trees were the shrubs of slumlords. I saw them and only saw money. :0)

      Delete
  4. I love jade plants. They are one of the few succulents that I grow. My friend has tons that she is generous enough to let me take very large cuttings of. They look so cool when their tips get red.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I need to visit my family in California more often. The last time I was there they let me take HUGE cuttings from the jade trees in their front yard. People who let you cut their plants like that are awesome!

      Delete
  5. Somehow I just can't grow jade plants, they just always die :( Perhaps one day I'll try again, I really do like them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Really? They're one of the easier succulents to grow in my experience. Although, jade trees do require a lot of light and won't do much of anything unless they get pretty close to near full-light in my growing experience.

      Delete
  6. I always loved jade plant but always managed to eventually kill them. I might have to try again.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Carolyn,

      How do you kill your jade trees? I have found that the easiest way to kill them is to give jade plants too much water and attention.

      Delete
    2. It's been well over 30 years since I killed one or even owned one I think. I'm sure I over watered. I remember the leaves being very puckered looking. I thought they needed water. I'm not sure anymore. :)

      Delete
    3. poor little thing was not waving, I'm DROWNing!

      Delete
  7. I tried propagating jade recently, too. My cuttings rooted just fine, but my leaves rotted :(. All the other how-to's on jade propagation said to let cuttings/leaves callous over for 24 hours. Maybe the leaves needed longer, like you said?

    I've gotta try this again. Thanks for the info. Btw, how long did it take for your leaves to start showing new growth?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. When I learned to propagate succulents by leaf cuttings, I was taught to wait 2-3 days for the callous to start to form. So I have always stuck with that rule of thumb.

      Delete
  8. Thanks for this! I just chopped back my jade plant because it was really top-heavy, and I saved a bunch of the leaves to try to root them. I saw something about just laying them down on the soil's surface, and they'd root, so I tried that. Unfortunately, the stupid cat dug them up, so I have to try again. I'll use your method this time, I think. :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. they do, lay down and grow. It is an adaptation to being the favoured food of elephants. Instead of sulking because the branch got knocked off by the elephant, it just grows where it lands.

      Delete
  9. When we moved back home, I left our house plants with Daughter in Tallahassee. Several of them are succulents, and I think one of them is a jade plant. I've tried rooting leaves before but didn't realize that a callus was necessary. No wonder they didn't survive. I will try again thanks to your advice. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  10. My first Jade was a bonsai. During its first winter in my house it started to look kind of sad and was dropping leaves, I thought it needed more light so I put it on the windowsill. Big mistake half of it just fell of the next day. I tried to root the piece to no avail, but the rest survived and I still have a little(r) jade bonsai.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Found this post via G+ and it has reassured me that I did buy the right soil (just based on gut instinct) - it meant I ignored the advice of the staff member on duty but ensuring my repotted money plant thrives is more important.

    You are right that they can survive a LONG time without water as my one was neglected for the whole of my PND which went on for over a year.

    Anyway it is beautifully re-homed now. Here's my post
    http://consciousmum.co.uk/consciously-clearing-clutter-and-money-plants/
    which lead me to look for yours (or rather search money plants on G+).

    Love your post, thanks
    Liska

    ReplyDelete
  12. Anonymous8:58 PM

    When we propagate the leaves does the soil have to be wet?
    the ends keep rotting on me :(

    ReplyDelete
  13. I live in Bulgaria and a friend asked me to take some photos of a house he had for sale,so took him home,he said wait and next think he comes out with this 2ft money tree,I still have it here in our hallway.Tony

    ReplyDelete
  14. I gifted my boss a Jade plant two months ago. she placed it on her table inside her office. I noticed that two stems fall off, so instead of allowing them to dry out, I researched about jade propagation. that is why I stumbled to you blog, thanks for this very informative post. I will follow your instructions and tips.this is my first ever succulent propagation project. hope it would be successful.

    ReplyDelete

Hi!

Feel free to leave a comment. You can always use the search box for my blog or the search "Google For Gardeners" if you're looking for gardening information. If you're looking for seed saving information check out "Seed Snatcher"search engine.

Do not have a blog yourself? Comment using the "anonymous" feature. If you have a Twitter or FB account feel free to use the "Name URL" feature so other people can find you.


Thanks for visiting.

Related Posts with Thumbnails

Like This Blog?

If you like this blog please subscribe via Email. No Spam, I promise, just the latest posts Emailed to you.

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner